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Innovation is a key ingredient to the longevity of a successful company. Times change, people’s behaviour changes, our needs and desires also change, and innovation is the answer to keeping fresh and having products and services that will be in demand. Without innovation, products become stale and obsolete, and the demand for your products and service deteriorates.

Social media can play a solid part in assisting you remain on trend by listening to feedback and ideas from the social web.  There is genuine opportunity in social data, enough to make social listening a permanent part in your company’s innovation strategy. The goal here is to listen using social analytics tools such as Nuvi, and listen and respond to product and client feedback, which will contribute to your product and/or service innovation.

Measurement of social media impact on innovation would be to collect data on:

* Opportunities and Threats – Becoming aware of potential opportunities or threats will enable you and your team to plan and be ready for action;
* Idea Resonance – Which ideas gain the most traction with your audience? What are you customers asking for? What are the most popular ideas?
* Idea Impact – What is the impact on the idea and the effect time has on the idea?

Collecting these metrics will assist with new product identification and service innovation. It will allow you to understand what people are engaging with, spotting the new trends and gaining competitor intelligence.  If collected and acted upon, this data will be the essence of your innovation moving forward.

This was the final part of our 6 part series in the Six Key Aspects to Inbound Marketing ROI. Please join our mailing list to be updated on new ebooks and white papers and follow us on twitter and Facebook.

Back to Part 5 – Customer Experience


For more information on anything in relation to social, digital or mobile – feel free to contact us at Mighty Media Group for a no obligation chat about how we can help you. Contact@mightymediagroup.com.au.

If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Inbound Marketers Manifesto

 


About the Author

Bruce GrantBruce Grant is the Chief Integration Officer at Mighty Media Group and has a wealth of expertise and experience with managing people and projects along with data, systems, workflows and technology. He oversees the company’s implementation and technology teams, driving transformation from social media and digital strategy, with a focus on inbound marketing, web development, sales enablement, SEO, social media marketing and campaigns, blogging, content creation, analytics and much more. Follow Bruce on Twitter @BruceJohnGrant or drop him an email anytime on bruce.grant@mightymediagroup.com.au.


Google

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Social media is all about the ‘customer experience’. The better the experience the greater the success of your company.

Social media’s impact on your customer is immediate, and when executed correctly will lead to additional benefits to your organisation such as brand health, better sentiment, cost savings and increased revenue.

When setting up and managing your social media execution strategy, recognise that all channels are not created equal and part of ‘getting it right’ is understanding how best to manage the customer experience relevant to each channel. If you are running a community forum, for example, it may be best to stand back and let your customers engage and help each other, and only come in to offer solutions when they are really stuck; whereas on Facebook, when a customer posts a question they expect the company to get back to them – and soon!

When it comes to issues raised on social media – silence is simply no longer acceptable. You need to own the problem and be seen to be actively assisting with is resolution. Effectively managing issues is one great way to earn loyal advocates.

There are a number of ways to measure the success of your customer experience with social media. We would suggest the main areas to focus on would be:

  • Attitudes – How are people talking about your brand?;
  • Intensity – What is the momentum and intensity of a topic or issue?;
  • Context – What drives sentiment and emotion?;
  • Blind Spots – What are we missing in relation to achieving great customer satisfaction scores?;
  • Issues and Crises – Are there existing or emerging service or product issues?; and
  • Service Levels – How quickly do we respond – can this be improved?

By measuring and collecting metrics within these areas you will be in a position to benchmark and further improve your service levels, optimise your content to what people care about, focus on direct engagement where necessary and be in a position to better identify and manage emerging issues and crises.

This was the fifth part of our 6 part series in the Six Key Aspects to Inbound Marketing ROI. The next and final instalment, Part 6 – Innovation is only a click away.

Back to Part 4 – Operational Efficiency. 


If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Inbound Marketers Manifesto

 


About the Author

Bruce GrantBruce Grant is the Chief Integration Officer at Mighty Media Group and has a wealth of expertise and experience with managing people and projects along with data, systems, workflows and technology. He oversees the company’s implementation and technology teams, driving transformation from social media and digital strategy, with a focus on inbound marketing, web development, sales enablement, SEO, social media marketing and campaigns, blogging, content creation, analytics and much more. Follow Bruce on Twitter @BruceJohnGrant or drop him an email anytime on bruce.grant@mightymediagroup.com.au.


Google

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When asked to prioritize their business objective using Altimeter’s Social Media Measurement Compass marketers are quick to select their primary goals as engagement, advocacy and increased revenue without consideration to the ways in which social media can improve operational efficiency. We all want our organisation to run a smoothly as possible and fine tune so that we can save on our company’s expenses, which in turn will deliver great profits.

Whilst there is an initial setup cost in social media and ongoing costs to outsource or resource community management and content production, there is no doubt that it can deliver operational efficiency and costs savings to an organisation over time. One area where social media kicks in and is a cost effective tool is with brand advocacy, where if done right, happy customers become brand ambassadors and help market to each other which extend the company’s reach for little or no extra cost. Another area is the accessibility to the customer – queries can be answered very quickly and inexpensively via social channels such as Twitter, than a more costly chat or phone interaction and call deflection is an easy factor to measure.

Not only are there the benefits with the social interactions, there are real benefits with scale. By way of blogs and authoritative content creation addressing the problems of your target online buyer persona, you are in effect answering many people’s questions at the same time. In the community at least 10 times the amount of people read post than write the questions – so you are getting a real economy of scale along with becoming the authority.

For measurement of social media’s impact on operational efficiency, we suggest looking at factors including call containment – where you can measure the potential cost saving by using social channels over call centres.  Refine your customer service content to reflect the time spent on pages more relevant to inquiries that are obvious from Google Analytic data. Map what topics your web visitors prefer, those which ones are most liked and shared.

You can also look at cost containment opportunities and decide which topics are best answered online. All of these metrics gathered will enable you to identify inefficiencies and align you web and social content to the main customer queries. It will also enable you to develop your fan base to accelerate the impact of your marketing, the passion of your customers, and deliver more meaningful insights around your product.

This was the fourth part of our 6 part series in the Six Key Aspects of Inbound Marketing ROI. The next instalment, Part 5 – Customer Experience is only a click away.

Back to Part 3 – Marketing Optimisation.


If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Inbound Marketers Manifesto

 


About the Author

Stephenie RodriguezStephenie Rodriguez founded Mighty Media Group, a leading data-driven digital, mobile and social marketing strategy and solutions firm, in 2004 and is currently the company’s Chief Executive Officer. She is also the former publisher of Ocean Drive Magazine (Australia), a speaker and futurist on all aspects of social technology, an evangelist of engagement,  and has advised companies including SSP – The Food Travel Experts, Austereo, JR/DutyFree, Radar Group of Companies, Transfield, Allied Mills, Lincoln Indicators, Income Solutions, and Bayer (Berocca), Toyota, Mercedes Benz, and the UN FAO. You’re likely to find her Tweeting here @digitalgodess or present at events such as #SXSWi, #TFWA, #Tedx and #SocialBiz.


Google

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Effective social and inbound marketing should begin with aligning core business goals with activities and channels to demonstrate ROI (Return on Investment). If you are a Director of Sales or the CFO (Chief Financial Officer) marketing optimisation is of no consequence. You will no doubt be clamouring for increased revenue whilst your customer service team will want to see improved customer experience. The question we are often asked is what kind of metrics can be placed around digital, mobile and social activities that can clearly demonstrate improved marketing and marketing optimisation.

Simply put, marketing optimisation is the improvement of the effectiveness of marketing programs, either do more with less or get a better result with the same level of investment. Measuring efficacy enables marketer to determine which channels perform better than others, which content is driving more engagement or conversions, and where the influencers and brand champions congregate.  At a fundamental level, this activity can help the marketing team make data driven decisions and a ‘marketing by numbers’ approach. As such, best practice is now to incorporate a measurement strategy into the initial planning phase of any campaign.

Measuring marketing campaigns for ROI not only tells us how successful are initiatives have been, but relevant metrics collected correctly will help us segment and customise our message to our specific buyer personas. If we work out what each segment likes and does not like for instance, we can customise our communications and messages more effectively.

CASE STUDY:  Mighty Media Group were planning with SSP –The Food Travel Experts and their brand Caffe Ritazza for their autumn drinks campaign. Leading up to the product to store date we launched a social campaign that gathered rich feedback and fostered pro-sumerism where customers could create a product name. Through an application we developed for Facebook, our fans were able to indicate that the display artwork of the new product was not visually aligned to consumer expectations around the flavour profile. The drink was an orange based coffee beverage, and the artwork eluded to mocha or chocolate.  Before thousands of dollars of poster and in-store merchandising was printed to introduce this new beverage, we were able to revisit the creative, align the message to the product, and had a far better result in that fiscal quarter.

Knowing what to measure also challenges contemporary marketers.  You should be measuring your Overall Campaign Performance compared to key targets as an indication of campaign effectiveness. We highly recommend campaign post-mortems, wherein you articulate the overall performance of the social channels when compared with traditional advertising campaigns, how the different segments perform and ensure that there is no cannibalisation on social channel from other successful channels.

The following are key metrics you should always review:

  • Actual Revenue;
  • Number of conversions;
  • Leads per $ spent (when compared with traditional marketing)

You should also aim to deliver what people want. By monitoring your content performance you’ll be in a better position to develop content programs geared towards those consumers who are most engaged. Monitoring who and how your content is engaged with will help you identify your key influencers, loyalists and “fan-boys” and shape your advocacy campaign strategies.

Key insights you should review as it relates to content performance would are fairly easy to report on and should become a part of your campaign marketing dashboard. We recommend looking beyond simple impression numbers and track how many people shared, liked your content and how the different medias perform against each other (eg video, eBook, long form articles, infographics) and the number of conversions through call to action buttons.

Each marketing channel should be measured for its performance over that of other channels your business or organisation might use, especially as it relates to social media marketing. As you begin to market on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn or Slideshare for B2B marketers, it’s handy to know which channel is better for acquisition, retention or driving direct sales and it is best measured by campaign performance over time. Measuring channel performance will articulate which basket your proverbial eggs of effort should be placed. Understanding the behaviour of your target audience as essential to using the platform appropriately. Right message, in the right place at the right time for the right person – note, this takes practice.

Effective marketers should consider the 80/20 rule and know that it rings even truer in the realm of word of mouth and social media. Advocates play a pertinent role – and their amplification of your message is not to be discounted.  To optimise marketing through social media identify which channels are frequented most by your loyal fans and customers. Know where your detractors are also lurking and monitor assets to ensure the integrity and atmosphere is never compromised. Measuring sentiment and passion can also give you further insight into a social net promoter score (NPS) – weighting the frequency and level of engagement you have with your community. Measuring this and using social as a feedback channel can prove useful for richer insights about your products and the effectiveness of your offline advertising.

The aspect of marketing optimisation will offer marketers a significant level of insight around planning, however has greater benefits of enabling segmentation to ensure greatest results at the ‘zero moment of truth’.

This was the third part of our 6 part series in the Six Key Aspects of Inbound Marketing ROI. The next instalment, Part 4 – is only a click away.

Back to Part 2 – Revenue Generation.


If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Inbound Marketers Manifesto

 


About the Author

Stephenie RodriguezStephenie Rodriguez founded Mighty Media Group, a leading data-driven digital, mobile and social marketing strategy and solutions firm, in 2004 and is currently the company’s Chief Executive Officer. She is also the former publisher of Ocean Drive Magazine (Australia), a speaker and futurist on all aspects of social technology, an evangelist of engagement,  and has advised companies including SSP – The Food Travel Experts, Austereo, JR/DutyFree, Radar Group of Companies, Transfield, Allied Mills, Lincoln Indicators, Income Solutions, and Bayer (Berocca), Toyota, Mercedes Benz, and the UN FAO. You’re likely to find her Tweeting here @digitalgodess or present at events such as #SXSWi, #TFWA, #Tedx and #SocialBiz.


Google

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The Moodie Report announced today that Mighty Media Group have made the shortlist for ‘The Moodies’, The Moodie Awards – the second annual airport-specific digital, mobile and social media awards. The announcement was made via various social media platforms and TheMoodieReport.com website.

MMG has been shortlisted for the Best Single Social Media Marketing Campaign – with our entry for our client JR/Duty Free and our #JRLoveHolidays Summer Snaps campaign.

This was an exciting photo hashtag campaign run using Facebook, Douban, Instagram and Weibo.

A shortlist of 82 individual entries across 14 categories has been generated from over 150 submissions made via a mix of self-nomination and a call for submissions from the industry, as well as judges’ nominations.

The overall winners will be announced in coming weeks and will be judged by an expert panel including: Mighty Media Group Pty Ltd Chief Enabling Officer Stephenie Rodriguez, SimpliFlying CEO Shashank Nigam and The Moodie Report Executive Director – Business Development & Innovation Matt Willey.

The criteria by which finalists will be judged fall under six broad headings, making up the Moodie 100 scoring system, as follows:

QUANTIFIABLE IMPACT

Here, judges will use quantifiable yardsticks to measure the impact of each nomination. For instance, nominated Facebook pages will be rated by the number of ‘likes’ and ‘check ins’; YouTube presence will be rated by the number of ‘views’; while the number of followers generated by a Twitter account will be noted. For airports, annual traffic will be taken into account when assessing the number of ‘likes’, ‘views’ or ‘followers’ their social media presence generates.

CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT

Many companies are present in social media, but too often they fail to update that presence or use it to create a meaningful relationship with their customers. Our judges will rate nominations according to how well companies engage their customers through digital and social media, to the level of interaction they achieve, and to the quality of the conversation they are able to generate.

VISUAL APPEAL

Visual quality and impact is critical across all categories, and especially so for the crucial On-Airport, In-Store Digital Media category. Our judges will look for quality of imagery, creativity and excellence in execution.

QUALITY OF CONTENT

The ways in which companies use digital and social media diverge considerably. Our judges will focus on originality and breadth of content and on methods employed to win the traveller’s attention. Extra merit will be earned by those companies aiming to do more than merely sell a product or service, but that use new media to create excitement and interest in the location in which they operate.

INCENTIVE TO SPEND

How are airports and operators using digital and social media to win spend from travellers? And how are they then ensuring those travellers become loyal customers? Our judges will look in detail at the methods deployed to encourage spend and their effectiveness.

 IMPACT ON THE TRAVELLER EXPERIENCE

Today, most travellers use mobile devices when they travel. The Moodies will look at how airports and retailers have tapped into the SoLoMo trend to make their customers’ experience easier and more enjoyable, whether through practical information, gift incentives or other initiatives.

See announcement.

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The further you venture down the social media or inbound marketing path with your boss, your colleagues or stakeholders the more likely you are to be asked to demonstrate the ROI of your activities as a marketer. Whilst some like to feel that ROI should mean return on influence and linked to soft KPIs like brand mentions and presence of an online community, expect to eventually here those four precious words “Show me the money!”

 

When I hear a company say they can’t articulate how their online and social marketing is delivering an increase in revenue, I have to ask why not and encourage a review of the process. Social channel conversations, Facebook pages and Instagram posts should be purposefully created by marketers who clearly understand whom they are trying to influence from vacuum cleaners for housewives or condoms for college coeds.

 

The have been many disputes and discussions flying across business blogs and websites arguing the ability to track online social activities to revenue generation. Whilst we can argue about click paths and debate that conversations lead to commerce, we can’t ignore a simple human principle: We buy from whom we LIKE. A web visitor researching a vacuum cleaner is likely to ask their friends for a recommendation on Facebook, or ask Twitter as well as search Google. They’d pick up a brand name and begin to scour the Internet as well as check on Facebook.

 

According to Edison Research in a study called The Social Habit, two thirds of 18-44 year olds who use social media follow brands and 72% of 25-34s do as well. The study also highlighted that the first place for brand research was on Facebook for product information and not the company’s boring website that is probably not responsively designed or optimized for mobile navigation. The research further indicated that the main reason for following a brand was for deals, offers and discounts (66%), followed by genuine affinity (56%) and for product information and education (55%).

 

In order to demonstrate clear ROI, marketers need to create a click path and firstly sales enable their websites and social assets to capture leads or ‘ask for the sale’. Where the sales process isn’t quite so straightforward, other key metrics around this would be the number of leads by channel and statements of intention such as requesting a test drive. If a post about your Acme widget on Facebook had a link that was created in such tools as Shoutlet or bit.ly, you would be able to measure the click through rate of that post, and gauge the level of your audience or online community’s engagement. Further, if that click through led to a landing page, wherein the visitor could take a second step, such as purchase the product they viewed, or request more information or download the product specification, then this would be a “stated expression of interest” and a certain conversion.

 

If then this visitor becomes a lead for longer tail sales processes, or indeed a customer by making an instant purchase, this is a direct way to measure the efficacy of social media and online marketing and make a direct correlation to revenue generation. Offering your customers instant coupons or daily deal codes exclusively on Twitter that were tallied as part of a social marketing scorecard could also attribute to revenue generation and be successfully measured. Counting the number of increased views of a product explainer video linked to a call to action for a test drive or demonstration webinar are other supplemental next steps to implement enabling interested parties become customers and increase revenue from social channels.

 

At a deeper level, social media and inbound marketing allows for companies to establish more intricate message segmentation, and deliver the messaging to reach the right person at the right time (when and where they want it). Content interaction and social activities can be weighted by audience, respondents and conversions and should be actively monitored for insight and opportunities, where to stoke the fires of conversation, and which influencers to somehow incentive for the amplification effect of word of mouth. These activities over time will give marketers a more concise vantage point of where to invest and which are their most engaged audiences by channel, product and marketing message.

 

Dell is one of many companies with a clear strategy that delivers increased revenue from social marketing with millions of dollars in product sales exclusively from Twitter. Dell invested in time, resources and technology to leverage the vast number of Twitter users who were talking about their computers and Dell products. By becoming a helpful brand and taking people from Twitter back to their sales enabled website, they were able to clearly show conversion but they first had to invest and get align their business goals and their processes and people.

 

This was the second part of our 6 part series in the Six Key Aspects to Inbound Marketing ROI. The next instalment, Part 3 – Marketing Optimisation is only a click away.

 

Back to Part 1 – Brand Health.


If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Inbound Marketers Manifesto

 


About the Author

Stephenie RodriguezStephenie Rodriguez founded Mighty Media Group, a leading data-driven digital, mobile and social marketing strategy and solutions firm, in 2004 and is currently the company’s Chief Executive Officer. She is also the former publisher of Ocean Drive Magazine (Australia), a speaker and futurist on all aspects of social technology, an evangelist of engagement,  and has advised companies including SSP – The Food Travel Experts, Austereo, JR/DutyFree, Radar Group of Companies, Transfield, Allied Mills, Lincoln Indicators, Income Solutions, and Bayer (Berocca), Toyota, Mercedes Benz, and the UN FAO. You’re likely to find her Tweeting here @digitalgodess or present at events such as #SXSWi, #TFWA, #Tedx and #SocialBiz.


Google

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Mighty Media Group has released its latest white paper on inbound marketing today “The Inbound Marketers Manifesto“.

Inbound marketing is a sound and effective way of connecting with new prospects by allowing them to find you.

This book is a great resource for anyone wanting to understand how to bring leads to you and to better position your business for increased sales and revenue. It takes you through the various components of inbound marketing.

This white paper covers:

+ The basics of Inbound Marketing – tips to get you started;
+ Expanding visibility;
+ Common mistakes to avoid;
+ The golden rules of Inbound Marketing;
+ The ideal mix – integrating Inbound Marketing into your overall marketing strategy; and
+ Seven critical metrics every marketer should be measuring.

 

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Ok, so your business has decided it is finally ready to invest the time and resources into social and inbound marketing activities. The most critical first step you will need to take is to ask yourself and your stakeholders to determine what the business expects these activities can positively impact.
Whilst the social channels and devices constantly evolve, one thing will always remain constant – the top line goals of the business.

 

In our practice, we introduced a Social Media Measurement Compass inspired by the work of Susan Etlinger of Altimeter. She created and delivered this concept in her marketing manifesto A Framework for Social Analytics and we have since adapted it to become a building block during our CIMA™ Audit process and essential to effective social and inbound marketing strategy implementation and shared herein with grateful attribution to Altimeter, Susan and Charlene Li.

 

(Authors Note: I had the privilege of hearing Susan articulate the origin of the compass in a green room chat at #Engage2013 in New York City and she is equally eloquent in person as she is on paper!)

 

The first in the visual narrative is Brand Health. A pedestrian definition of brand health is what others feel, think, say or articulate by their actions about your brand. Monitoring this critical component has many benefits. It can alert you of potential threats and dynamic evangelists. Paying attention to the volume of conversations online, and comparing them to the amount of mentions of your competitors will give you an indication of share of voice.
This powerful number will give some depth to how your above the line campaigns are resonating, how your company is perceived, and what is most popular among online stakeholders and should not be minimized.

 

Whilst essential, the best word of mouth and brand signal is never a result of a massive advertising spend. It is typically a result of a business just being awesome with their product, customer service, a good place to work, and a bi-product of well-executed corporate social responsibility.

 

Some other essential metrics around this critical component is the lifetime value of the customer. Measuring the loyalty and duration of a relationship, increased and made more obvious through digital, mobile or social campaigns aligned with churn (the attribution due to causes beyond a business’s control) are two factors in identifying the requisite volume of leads that need to be attributed to such activities to determine their raw impact and value on an annual basis.

 

Brand Health is often a top priority for c-suite executives when investing in digital, mobile and social media strategy. If your organisation is concerned about whether your social activities contribute to brand loyalty, this is a key aspect in measuring your return on investment and influence.

 

This was the first part of our 6 part series in the Six Key Aspects of Inbound Marketing ROI. The next instalment, Part 2 – Revenue Generation is only a click away.

 


If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Inbound Marketers Manifesto

 


About the Author

Stephenie RodriguezStephenie Rodriguez founded Mighty Media Group, a leading data-driven digital, mobile and social marketing strategy and solutions firm, in 2004 and is currently the company’s Chief Executive Officer. She is also the former publisher of Ocean Drive Magazine (Australia), a speaker and futurist on all aspects of social technology, an evangelist of engagement,  and has advised companies including SSP – The Food Travel Experts, Austereo, JR/DutyFree, Radar Group of Companies, Transfield, Allied Mills, Lincoln Indicators, Income Solutions, and Bayer (Berocca), Toyota, Mercedes Benz, and the UN FAO. You’re likely to find her Tweeting here @digitalgodess or present at events such as #SXSWi, #TFWA, #Tedx and #SocialBiz.


Google

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Each day, our clients and friends ask us to review their strategy and give the advice about how to optimise their message and their inbound marketing activities. As marketers, it is indeed our responsibility to deliver a clear ROI for digital marketing.

Whether you are a B2B (Business to Business), B2C (Business to Consumer), FMCG (Fast Moving Consumer Goods) product, or a Duty Free Retailer, you have no doubt spent time in meeting rooms and scouring the web to work out what social networks you should be using, what technology you should be measuring with, and checking out your competitors activities to get some visual reference on the state of the market. One critical task to ensure you are on the right path is to identify what content your audience needs, searches and wants, and where and how they ultimately like to consume it.

This article series is designed to provoke your thinking and give you some key pulse checks for your inbound marketing strategy. If you find you don’t have a plausible answer for each question, we suggest regrouping your team and fleshing out each aspect until there is a working comfort level. You may not have an instant answer but embrace the unknown and seek it out. Iteration is an essential step towards clarity.

Q1: Do You Have a Plan?

Whilst elementary, conquering anything always starts with a stated objective. Are you trying to increase the size of your database, shift sentiment from positive to negative, top up sales funnels, or increase share of voice online? Each is a noble intention. An intention becomes a goal when it is articulated into a plan.

Within our business practice, we always encourage our clients to use our Altimeter-inspired Social Business Measurement Compass to prioritize what the top-line levers will move and what the future planned activity needs to accomplish.

The six steps are set out below – and we have written a 6 part series on how to measure ROI for each:

Once the six are set by order of importance, articulate further how the business (as it is at the present) can deliver on the stated business objectives. Ask yourself what your business is ultimately trying to achieve. Review the skill sets and strengths of your team. Do they need future up-skilling to deliver on a new set of inbound marketing activities? Ensure that your Pillars of Governance are in place and a framework exists that articulates the expectations and responsibilities of the employees to work the plan.

Whether this be delivered in a working business paper, plotted on an Excel spreadsheet, or incorporated into a traditional marketing plan, make sure that this plan is one that is regularly audited for performance and is constantly on the money to reinforce that those involved know what roles they play, where you are presently in the business journey, and where you want to go.

If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Inbound Marketers Manifesto

 


About the Author

Stephenie RodriguezStephenie Rodriguez founded Mighty Media Group, a leading data-driven digital, mobile and social marketing strategy and solutions firm, in 2004 and is currently the company’s Chief Executive Officer. She is also the former publisher of Ocean Drive Magazine (Australia), a speaker and futurist on all aspects of social technology, an evangelist of engagement,  and has advised companies including SSP – The Food Travel Experts, Austereo, JR/DutyFree, Radar Group of Companies, Transfield, Allied Mills, Lincoln Indicators, Income Solutions, and Bayer (Berocca), Toyota, Mercedes Benz, and the UN FAO. You’re likely to find her Tweeting here @digitalgodess or present at events such as #SXSWi, #TFWA, #Tedx and #SocialBiz.


Google

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As more and more companies are turning to social media to optimize online conversations, real time feedback and better customer engagement, it is essential to get foundations and footings in place that protect the reputation of the business. In the very nature of social, the voice and interpretation of company messages are no longer left to the Public Relations Director or the CEO as open social networks allow for propagation of communication from many sources, official and unofficial.

Online reputation management is now a compliance factor for publically listed companies, however private companies must too set parameters of comfort and outline success for those in the business who might participate in the company narrative.
 

Like any stable foundation, it is essential to establish tenants or Pillars of Governance that will provide the framework for social business success.

 

1. Internal Social Media Policy

As your company recognizes the important role that the Internet plays in shaping it’s reputation about your products or services, it is essential that your team are abreast of what is appropriate and not okay as it relates to subject matter expertise, tone, and opinions expressed on official channels like your company’s Facebook Page, official Twitter account, or LinkedIn Page. Your internal social media policy should also articulate the how you will monitor personal social profiles of your staff, how you are using social listening tools to monitor company brand mentions, and the treatment of confidential information on open social networks. If some of your employees have personal blogs, determine how this may be a positive contribution to your online goals, or ask them to ensure their activities are not counter-productive. Either way, it is important that this document covers off what is not permitted but gives positive framework and encourages employees to participate appropriately.
 

2. House Rules (External Social Policy)

On open social networks like Facebook, it is important (and indeed essential in countries like Australia where legislature has been past mandating page owner liability) to articulate as a business what is and is not appropriate to post. Such items that need to be stated are about quality of content, anti-spam and anti-bullying, and what behavior will result in a banning or a removal of a contributor’s content. For an example of a House Rules policy, see our tab on Facebook. Do know that a third party application for which to house this content on Facebook (in the form of a Tab) on your Fan Page will require a third party plug in and some minor development work. Facebook does not supply this and we can help.
 

3. Disclaimer Statements

Whilst kept short and succinct, if an employee is identifying themselves in their personal profiles by their company and role for example “Director of Product for Acme”, encourage them to state that their views are not those of the company and any RT’s (retweets) or links shared are not to be considered an endorsement (unless of course if the purpose of the social profile is to express the views of the company).
 

4. Privacy Policy

Whilst on most websites this is boiler plate copy and has a place for which it is on display, once your business is socializing and collecting any social user profile data, it is important to articulate how the company will use and treat this data, what it will not be doing with the information, and how the information is stored and disposed of. If you do not intent to share or sell the data, articulate that to give your social community peace of mind and establish some trust. If you do intend to share their content (such as the instance of a photo competition) and use it on other channels, spell this out clearly in the terms and conditions.

Establishing these four policies within the business will mitigate social risk as employees are encouraged to become actively involved with an understanding of their roles and responsibilities granted with their privilege of participation.
 
Got a policy we should add or a great example of social business governance policies? Create some good karma and contribute in the comments below.
 

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About the Author

Stephenie RodriguezStephenie Rodriguez founded Mighty Media Group, a leading data-driven digital, mobile and social marketing strategy and solutions firm, in 2004 and is currently the company’s Chief Executive Officer. She is also the former publisher of Ocean Drive Magazine (Australia), a speaker and futurist on all aspects of social technology, an evangelist of engagement,  and has advised companies including SSP – The Food Travel Experts, Austereo, JR/DutyFree, Radar Group of Companies, Transfield, Allied Mills, Lincoln Indicators, Income Solutions, and Bayer (Berocca), Toyota, Mercedes Benz, and the UN FAO. You’re likely to find her Tweeting here @digitalgodess or present at events such as #SXSWi, #TFWA, #Tedx and #SocialBiz.


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