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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Social Media Agency Mighty Media Group Celebrate JR/DutyFree Win of The Moodies Award

Australia-based social media agency today announce and commend their client, James Richardson DutyFree (JR/DutyFree) in their joint win of The Moodies Award for Best Social Media Campaign by an Airport Concessionnaire with it’s entry for the #JRLoveHolidays omni-channel execution across English speaking and Chinese social networks.

 

Stephenie Rodriguez, CEO of Mighty Media Group explained, “The #JRLoveHolidays campaign demonstrates the powered of integrated marketing and how to drive customer engagement and generate important consumer insights as a bi-product of social media marketing. We’re proud of the team that worked on this project and our client, JR/DutyFree.”

Ashley Thompson, Marketing Manager of JR/DutyFree said “We’re thrilled to have worked with Mighty Media Group and leverage social media in new ways. Winning a Moodie Award is a thrill for our business and we’re delighted with the results.”

Mighty Media Group is a digital, mobile and social media agency founded in 2004. In the last decade it’s enabled large and small businesses including global food  and beverage travel retailer SSP – The Food Travel Experts, Berocca, Austereo, Camilla, JR/DUTYFREE, MAVI Jeans, Allied Mills and  helped many others unlock the potential of improved online communication, increase revenue and improve customer experience.  An end-to-end social media agency, MMG offer strategy, web and application development, community management and social campaigns, social benchmarking and analytics and integration advice.

For more information about #JRLoveHolidays Campaign contact Stephenie Rodriguez at Mighty Media Group on +61 416 08 9000.If you would like a copy of the winning campaign case study, please click the link here.

ENDS


For more information contact:

Stephenie Rodriguez, CEO, Mighty Media Group

+61 416 08 9000

contact@mightymediagroup.com.au

http://www.mightymediagroup.com.au

 

 

 

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Today Social Media Agency Mighty Media Group Releases the Business Owners Guide to Inbound Marketing

Sydney, NSW Australia, March 27, 2014

We all know that marketing is shifting, and how we reach our customers has also changed. Companies are faced with new challenges in order reach their customers. For businesses that still rely on traditional broadcast methods of advertising their product or service this change in consumer behaviour poses quite a challenge. Continue reading

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To some SEO and Marketing might seem like apples and oranges, however search engine optimisation (SEO) is no longer a secret weapon of bleeding edge propeller heads or black hat wearing marketers. It’s critical to online success. Most traditional companies have to make sure they rank in search on websites like Yahoo and Google and that they find them consistently — because search engines are the primary way prospects and influencers learn about products and services as the Yellow Pages are now a click away on our laptops, mobile phones and tablets.

In most instances companies de-prioritise SEO or glaze over during conversations about search engine optimisation because the leadership team does not understand it well enough to provide the necessary validation and support. If you as a CMO do not view it as priority, marketing and sales people are will be even more resistant to put it on the to-do list. Using the “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it” logic marketers will apply traditional more common approaches, shying away from one of the most efficient, measurable ways to get in front of potential clients and genuinely interested eyeballs. Here at Mighty Media Group, we believe that SEO is an essential aspect of effective digital, social and mobile marketing for both B2B and B2C marketers and credit inspiration for this article to Todd Miechiels, who articulated this in 2006 before the rise of social media and the onslaught of opportunity that channels like Twitter and LinkedIn create for pre-purchase research and Zero Moment of Truth serendipity.

Delegating SEO to the IT Department or the webmaster, you’ll focus on the technical aspects of SEO and lose sight of the more important strategic aspects. Spiders, meta-tags, hits and visits don’t mean much to company others in your C-Suite and or your shareholders. Results‚ in terms of better leads and more of them however do. What you should be aiming for are better, higher quality traffic and a shorter path to purchase.

As a CMO here are the questions you should be asking:

What do we want our web visitors to focus on?

Whether your desired response is a to get someone to sign up to your data base, ask for a demo, download a product specification sheet or complete an inquiry form, it’s important to have a plan articulated and understood across the business. It is likely that each web visitor will have a unique need, so there are probably several different actions you should be paying attention to. If your contacts page gets the most clicks, it is likely that your website lacks pertinent details obvious to the web visitor. If your Store Locator gets the most hits, that too would be an indication.

Focus image created by http://www.mightymediagroup.com.au

How many of these visitors are converting?

New to marketing metrics is the “Take Rate”. I first read about this in Mark Jeffery’s book Data Drive Marketing – the 15 Metrics Everyone in Marketing Should Know.  Simply put, a “take rate” is the number of impressions to the number of conversions — whatever that conversion point is. In his book, he cites the example of a QR Code leading to a microsite where folks could sign up for a test drive of a new Porsche Cayenne. Previously a website’s success was based on unique search visitors. Knowing this number now and tracking it each month will give you quick insight into the quality and quantity of your search traffic. Do not be surprised to learn that as much as ninety-nine percent of this traffic is not taking the desired action. Pulling in the right traffic and converting it into bona fide leads is a never-ending challenge and requires the use of landing pages, content, and social proof. Knowing how well (or poorly) you’re doing in this area is a big first step. Lots of traffic without conversions is an indication that your content model needs some attention.  Google Analytics offers marketers clear insights into daily traffic, demographics, click path and bounce rates but doesn’t on it’s own tell the whole story.

What percentage of my traffic leave within the first 10 seconds?

What Todd Miechiels  refers to as “short visit syndrome” is that magical number of people who came and left, quickly making a split second decision that your website wasn’t for them. Focusing on unique visits tells us a couple of things. You should review your keyword strategy. You should also ask yourself is your website doing an adequate job of engaging and feeding the curiosity of each web visitor and delivering to them what they are searching for? I’ve watch companies who really could not afford it  spend lots of money and resources to drive search traffic, only to have the a significant number click away within 10 seconds. Developing a content marketing strategy that feeds the web visitors, and our natural curiosity. Your website should serve to foster trust as a subject matter expert. Doing this will improve time on site.

Which search phrases are we focusing on?

You want to come up on the search engines for the phrases that your best prospects and influencers are likely to type. You’d be surprised at how differently people actually search, compared to how your sales and marketing people think they search. This is because most searches occur in the research and investigation phases of the buying cycle. In fact, more than half of all B2B searches for purchases over $50,000 occur between two and six months before a purchase is ever made. And often, the person doing the searching may not have the technical understanding of your product or service. The key is to consider carefully how your audience searches (Google Keyword tools will give you some great initial findings) and come up with a list of approximately 20 phrases that become your company’s target phrases. These are the phrases that you should measure and develop your content around. If you haven’t already, develop your online buyer personas so that each page of your website exists for the express need state of your web visitor, be it in the research, derisking, or advocacy stages.

How often are we appearing for our target phrases?

Too often, a webmaster, marketing manager or even CMO assumes everything is up to par because the company appears at the top of Google for their company name or some extremely specific, non-competitive phrase. It’s important to know how often you are coming up in Google search queries (as well as other major engines like Yahoo and MSN) for your target phrases as a whole. While it may be more rewarding to focus on where you are coming up, it is more productive to see where you are not currently coming up, and thus missing opportunities.

How often are we appearing compared to the competition?

Whilst it does sound trivial, it is important to know how often your competition is being found on the search engines compared to you.  After all, the Internet and search engines have become the largest, most prolific sales marketplace on earth. Follow these stats so that you can better understand your online share of voice. Social listening tools like Nuvi and Radian 6 can help you listen to brand mentions and track how many conversations are being started about you, your products and your leadership team.

Integrating SEO into your Marketing – The Convergence

Obviously, there are other and even more important things that as a CMO you’ll want to know about an SEO effort such as the cost per lead, number of opportunities generated, the amount of revenue generated to name a few. Most executives assume that someone is tracking this information and reporting on it. But more than likely, no one is. Beginning to capture and act upon some of the basic points covered here could act as a catalyst to help measure the true effectiveness and better define what your company does online. After all, your website should be your best performing salesperson — it never goes on holidays, gets the flu, or has a bad hair day.

All of this data should be readily available to you if your company invested time to articulate a prudent SEO strategy and implemented appropriate tools. If this  information is not part of regular marketing reporting consider making a mandate. Compared to the amount of energy and resources you are currently spending to generate new business, integrating SEO and marketing may be the most efficient and cost-effective way to fill your pipeline.


About the Author

Stephenie RodriguezStephenie Rodriguez founded Mighty Media Group, a leading data-driven digital, mobile and social marketing strategy and solutions firm, in 2004 and is currently the company’s Chief Executive Officer. She is also the former publisher of Ocean Drive Magazine (Australia), a speaker and futurist on all aspects of social technology, an evangelist of engagement,  and has advised companies including SSP – The Food Travel Experts, Austereo, JR/DutyFree, Radar Group of Companies, Transfield, Allied Mills, Lincoln Indicators, Income Solutions, and Bayer (Berocca), Toyota, Mercedes Benz, and the UN FAO. You’re likely to find her Tweeting here @digitalgodess or presenting at events such as #SXSWi, #TFWA, #Tedx and #SocialBiz.


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The SXSW Interactive experience is never a disappointment. I love all the keynotes, tech talks and events. There is no single greater place to go as a digital marketer if you want to watch marketers talk to marketers. Think about that one for a moment, then respect the challenge. If you were to ask me why I make a journey thousands of miles, at a huge cost that I front as a business, I’d explain that I go to be inspired and then let the future unravel.

Australia is a long way away from the Silicone Valley, Alley or where ever, and we are often removed from the trickle effect and impact moments when trends emerge merely due to the fact that we are upside down in time and season. Moving beyond my thoughts on Lady Gaga  whilst the suitcase still needs unpacking and my feet are still sore, I thought I would share my top three inspiration points from SXSW Interactive 2014. (These are not trends, mind you, just my personal journey and experiences.)

This is a photo of Gary Vaynerchuk taken by Tom Treanor giving a keynote on stage at SXSW Interactive 2014 in Austin Texas.
Photo by Tom Treanor (Meltwater)

Inspiration Point 1: NOW is the time.

My first inspiration came from attending Gary Vaynerchuk’s opening keynote on How to Rock SXSW and get the most out of the Conference that took place on Friday.  As a third year veteran of the Interactive experience, I wasn’t expecting to get schooled. I went along more to get entertained as Gary is one of my favourite entrepreneurs and public speakers. I go to check out his banter and swagger and hope that a little bit of that could rub off on me by just breathing the same air.  In his keynote he talks about why those young-bloods in the room there to hustle for VC were the luckiest mo-fo’s ever (and yes, he used the naughty word). He said there was no more perfect moment than this, where we the people are finally thinking with the devices and technology and it was convergence at it’s best. As a 17 year veteran of the internet, I had to clap my hands and shout AMEN!  Too true is it that now is the time to think about what the world needs – find a need and fill it first.

We are all now open, ready and full of possibility. His opening keynote inspired me with an idea that has now germinated and given me a new start up concept. @GaryVee will be given a few shares in the business for my indebtedness and gratitude. (Hat tip to Tom Treanor who wrote a great blog about this keynote which you can find here.

Inspiration Point 2:  Be Mindful, Open and Present

This is an image of Stephenie Rodriguez and Heather Vescent Schlegel
Heather Schlegel (Futurist) & I

On the flight from LAX to Austin, I queued next to an interesting looking gal with long blonde and purple hair. She was talking to someone on the phone about SXSW and in the spirit of openness that participation at the Conference promotes, I started a casual chat. We spent the next few hours on the flight in Row 2 on Southwest talking about ourselves, our businesses, and our SXSW expectations. She said for her this year was all about being mindful and present. Forgetting all the outside distractions and focusing on what was happening in the immediate – who you were listening to, what your gut was saying when you were hearing a pitch or a presentation, and remain open to the possibilities and potential that existed in everyone and everywhere. There were no “right” people to meet. Everyone was “right” in her eyes as there was something to learn and share in every single exchange.

I asked her about why she, Heather Vescent Schlegel was attending. She informed me that she was on a panel on the Monday and as a Futurist, it is important for her to network and stay on trend but she and those in her trio were really going to take the concept of intimacy and technology to a whole new level. Suffice to say Heather and I became fast friends and ultimately wound up rooming together and are now collaborating on my new project inspired by Gary. Her words aligned me to a level that from the idea that came about in Gary’s keynote, I was able to iterate and vet it with a Principle from Deloitte in San Francisco who then committed my first token venture capital on the new idea and gave me a commitment to mentor this new venture – in an MOU on the back of a napkin in a sushi bar in the Austin Convention Centre.

This is a photo taken of Melissa Ethridge singer songwriter taken by Stephenie Rodriguez at the Deloitte party at SXSW Interactive in Austin Texas.
Melissa Ethridge at the Hangar

Serendipity both personally and professional abounded simply everywhere, and I would love to make an augmented reality application that could show this. Staying open, mindful and in the flow not only brought me amazing new business connections, but also got me on stage at Stubbs for the entire Snoop Dog concept thanks to my AirBnb mate Veronica, one meter from the stage for an acoustic set by Melissa Ethridge at the Deloitte event, a personal moment on a lounge with Guy Kawasaki thanks to PayPal, a candid chat about marketing with the lovely Ekaterina Walter (author of The Power of Visual Storytelling) and a VIP invite to Lady Antebellum concert in Reno on the way home. I met the very lovely Australian Bille Whitehouse and discussed her wearable technology concepts at the DeCoded event at Wanderlust.

This is an image taken from backstage of rapper artist Snoop Dog taken at Stubbs venue in Austin Texas during the PayPal party for SXSW 2014.
Snoop Dog performing for PayPal in Austin

 

Inspiration 3: Market to Curiosity

As part of our internal SXSW by Proxy initiative, I agreed with my team to attend a session on their behalf. For our head Community Manager, Peta I attended Content Shock – The Future of Social Media – a presentation by author and strategist Mark Schaefer. In a future blog to be linked when it’s out of draft I’ll dish what I loved about it, but the big take away was the concept not trying to permeate people’s social graphs and spam them. We humans as of late have become experts in filtering marketing messages. What he recommended marketers consider which really resonated with me was not to try to penetrate the virtual igloo we have created for ourselves, but rather to draw potential customers to us. This is typical to what we refer to internally as “pull” marketing, but I got something more from it.

I realised that our job as marketers was much simpler and so incredibly profound.  Curiosity is one of the strongest emotive drivers of action. All that we do should simply make people curious. As I mentioned at the beginning of this article, marketing to marketers is an incredible challenge. We’re a really tough crowd to cut through. We might see your banners and balloons, but we won’t care or share. If you make us think, feel and desire that is where the magic happens.

I saw this manifest as I patiently was one of those punters queueing up to enter the Oreo Experience where you could #eatatweet and watch a custom made 3d printed edible Oreo cookie be created which was then yours to sample at the milk bar. The legend is that this installation held two hours long queues for most of SXSWi, in the rain! People weren’t hungry for a damn cookie, they were curious. I was curious.

I saw a street team standing in front of the Samsung Blogger Lounge with a monkey on a lead and a small crowd gathering in the street.  Why? What? I stopped had a photo with it, and they included my picture in their tweet to me. I had never had a monkey sit on my shoulder. Curiosity roped me in.

A blank van appeared on a block and street team were asking for pedestrians to “vandalise” it – it had been transformed into a mobile white board.  Clever. I wrote the answer to the question I felt about soda with a bright orange fluorescent marker — “Soda is not better than water.” (Does anyone actually feel anything about soda? Was this a consumer insights piece for Coca-Cola? — one will never know.)

There is so many amazing experiences that happens at SXSW – from vetting suppliers to looking at new app technology, learning about emerging trends in digital marketing, having a beer with someone you consider to be a thought leadership and rehashing their inspirational talks, and watching the impact of convergence of many industries including media, music, art, and technology. I highly recommend making the time and taking your team.

If you were there, what were your key inspirations and take aways? Leave me a comment please.


About the Author

Stephenie RodriguezStephenie Rodriguez founded Mighty Media Group, a leading data-driven digital, mobile and social marketing strategy and solutions firm, in 2004 and is currently the company’s Chief Executive Officer. She is also the former publisher of Ocean Drive Magazine (Australia), a speaker and futurist on all aspects of social technology, an evangelist of engagement,  and has advised companies including SSP – The Food Travel Experts, Austereo, JR/DutyFree, Radar Group of Companies, Transfield, Allied Mills, Lincoln Indicators, Income Solutions, and Bayer (Berocca), Toyota, Mercedes Benz, and the UN FAO. You’re likely to find her Tweeting here @digitalgodess or presenting at events such as #SXSWi, #TFWA, #Tedx and #SocialBiz.


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Today Lady Gaga gave an intimate interview at SXSW (South By Southwest) Music Festival in Austin Texas. She candidly dished the dirt about her performance last night and whilst I was not there to witness first hand, apparently included a mechanical pig, and being vomited on by a performance artist. Whilst not everyone’s cup of tea as it relates to her choice of performance art, she certainly had much to say today about her past, her fans and her ethos as an artist that we marketers can take note of.

Lesson 1:  “Don’t Sell Out – Sell In!” – Lady Gaga

When Lady Gaga said this today, it hit home. She proceeded to articulate that in her career, she was often told her show was ‘too gay’. She took this as a compliment because a strong core of her fans were gay as well as those friends close to her. To exclude them as a part of her demographic would be like asking her to have a personality transplant — never going to happen. She knows who is most loyal to her and those fans whom celebrate her uniqueness and accept her as she morphs and grows as an artist. What we marketers can be reminded of from this is that we should invest in our advocates and remember the 80/20 rule of business. If you do not presently have a personal relationship with your top fans, friends, followers and advocate rethink your strategies. Celebrate their love for your product and create unique experiences exclusively for them.

Lesson 2: “Nobody will remember what you Tweeted when you are dead.” – Lady Gaga

The Mother of All Monsters nails it again in that statement. We marketers place so much emphasis on creating amazing posts and putting together 140 characters of sheer brilliance but at the end of the day, Twitter won’t make our products, businesses or companies any better. Social media on any channel can’t save a crappy company. What she proceeds to say after this is that social media allows her to stay infinitely connected directly with her customers. She takes it very seriously, also stating that she uses Salesforce to manage her relationships because she believes it is vital to her success. Our take away from this is that our social marketing efforts should be aligned with our passion for making good products and memorable experiences. Social media is just another place to celebrate our customers and their passion for what we do. What we post on social channels should evoke the feeling that we want our customers to have. If we remember what Maya Angelou and Gaga said as a rule, our content should always resonate our brands values. #MakeThemFeelIt

Lesson 3:  “Create meaningful relationships with good partners who share your passion.”

Lady Gaga performed on a stage sponsored by Doritos. There were some who criticised her choice and some media backlash which she addressed today in her SXSW Music keynote/interview. She articulated that Doritos made a generous donation to her charity to empower youth – the Born This Way Foundation – for her performance whilst not limiting her by putting artistic restrictions on stage. Doritos called the stage the Bold Stage, and aligned their branding with perhaps the most brazen of all musical artists I’ve ever seen. Lady Gaga further states that there is much to gain from collaboration, and in marketing, aligning our purpose with others can have a significant benefits. Our takeaway is to reach out to others outside our businesses who have shared values and similar communities for greater reach and opportunity. Where it be in guest blogging, re-sharing a partners content on Facebook, or creating joint contests and branded events – be open and have some fun. Magic happens when we have the positive energy and open our hearts up to possibility — that’s been her a part of her business success and clearly, it’s working.

Got a marketing lesson you learned from Gaga?  Please share it in the comments. I would love to hear it.

Yes, proudly a lil Monster… Stephenie Rodriguez


If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Business Owners Guide to Inbound Marketing

 


About the Author

Stephenie RodriguezStephenie Rodriguez founded Mighty Media Group, a leading data-driven digital, mobile and social marketing strategy and solutions firm, in 2004 and is currently the company’s Chief Executive Officer. She is also the former publisher of Ocean Drive Magazine (Australia), a speaker and futurist on all aspects of social technology, an evangelist of engagement,  and has advised companies including SSP – The Food Travel Experts, Austereo, JR/DutyFree, Radar Group of Companies, Transfield, Allied Mills, Lincoln Indicators, Income Solutions, and Bayer (Berocca), Toyota, Mercedes Benz, and the UN FAO. You’re likely to find her Tweeting here @digitalgodess or present at events such as #SXSWi, #TFWA, #Tedx and #SocialBiz.


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So you have setup some social channels for your business: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. You have spent time posting, tweeting, responding to questions, following fans and engaging with your advocates. But how is it all going?

If you are engaging in social media than you should be measuring your activities.
There are so many metrics and so much data available. If you look at the Facebook insights for example – it alone has over 1700 columns of data ranging from your daily likes to post reach to comments and click. All this data and so little time!

More data does not necessarily equal better understanding – it just means more options – which can be a good thing. However the key to understanding how your social success is coming along is to line up the metrics that best suit your social objective. Today I am going to briefly look at 5 metrics that I believe every marketer should measure, and the good news is that it is easier than you may think!

Volume

One of the most basic ways to measure social success to through volume. How big is the conversation about your brand? This is a good start because people talk about things they are interested in. But volume is more than just counting tweets, posts and likes. You need to step back and see the big picture and measure the number of messages about your brand and track how your numbers change over time. In order to do this efficiently there are a number of listening tools available that do the work for you across all platforms, such as Nuvi. Facebook insights has many useful metrics, in addition to its many counters, but they only measure Facebook. To understand the full picture you should look across all channels including blogs, twitter and across the web. When you receive your insights you should be looking at what days and times volume is higher – and use that information to focus publishing more of your own post during these times.

Volume

Share of Voice

Not only should you track volume in relation to your brand but you should also compare your brand to your competitors. How does the conversation about your brand compare to conversations about your competitors? Determine what percentage of the overall conversation about your industry is focused on your brand compared to your competitors. That is your share of voice. Learn from your competitor’s success and failures. Social listening tools such a Nuvi are a great and easy way to measure your share of voice and allow you to see the growth or decline in your share of voice before it is too late.

Reach

Reach measures how far your conversation spreads. It is how many people have seen your conversation, post or tweet, and is a measure of the potential size of your audience.

Pick important action or engagement numbers like click, retweets, comments or replies and divide them by reach to calculate an engagement percentage. (Of the possible audience (reach) how many people participated?)

Overview

Sentiment

The easiest way to define sentiment is “detecting and understanding how the audience is reacting to a brand, either positively or negatively.” This is usually done by assigning whether comments are neutral, positive or negative and calculating the overall percentage. In today’s highly competitive listening software market, the inclusion of automatic sentiment analysis is fast being coming a deal breaker. There are some issues with auto sentiment allocation such as context, ambiguity and sarcasm, so when choosing a product, make sure the automatic sentiment analysis is able to learn, by that I mean when you correct some of the tags that the software may have assigned incorrectly, it starts to learn what you see as neutral, positive and negative, and make the necessary changes to the way it auto assigns. The use of sentiment must be taken in context. Even finely tuned auto sentiment analysis will never be 100%. But it will be enough to determine trends, what is liked more and what is likes less, and that can be a very useful metric to a product or services team.

Sentiment

Engagement

Engagement is one of the most important metrics as it is essentially what all good social marketers strive for. How are people participating in the conversations about your brand? What are they doing to spread your content and advocate engagement with your topic? Metrics for engagement include retweets, shares, comments and replies. When deciding on the metrics that are important for your brand, consider are you more interested in spreading the message (retweets and shares) or are you more interested in generating interaction (replies, comments) or both. The next thing to look for is what types of content generate the most engagement? It may surprise you what people interact with, it may not always be what you would think. Use these insights to help you generate more content that invokes more engagement.

By using a combination of the above metrics on a weekly and monthly basis, you should be in a great position to see how successful your social activities are, and be in the position to make the necessary changes when things re not going as planned.


For more information on anything in relation to social, digital or mobile – or for some advice or assistance with your social media strategy or how to measure, feel free to contact us at Mighty Media Group for a no obligation chat about how we can help you. Contact@mightymediagroup.com.au.

If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Business Owners Guide to Inbound Marketing

 


About the Author

Bruce GrantBruce Grant is the Chief Integration Officer at Mighty Media Group and has a wealth of expertise and experience with managing people and projects along with data, systems, workflows and technology. He oversees the company’s implementation and technology teams, driving transformation from social media and digital strategy, with a focus on inbound marketing, web development, sales enablement, SEO, social media marketing and campaigns, blogging, content creation, analytics and much more. Follow Bruce on Twitter @BruceJohnGrant or drop him an email anytime on bruce.grant@mightymediagroup.com.au.


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Did curiosity really kill the cat?  If the ‘said’ cat is anything like the black bundle of purring fur sleeping on my mouse mat as I write this blog, then it is a no!  But like most cats, mine included, they dive into anything and everything, always looking out for the next ‘thing’ that moves. So too, we as an audience can’t help ourselves when faced with intrigue, or when our curiosity it peaked.  We are always on the look out for something new.  Curiosity is one of the big movers in any audience to find out more, to seek, or to look at new products. If marketed correctly, what then follows is the desire to have or to make a purchase.  However, in order to attract your audience, you have to create the curiosity in the first place.

CuriosityBut how do you create this curiosity? As a business owner you are passionate about your product and/or service and you most likely believe you have the ‘must have’ product or service.  However in order for your product or service to be sold, your potential buyer needs to know it exists.  It is simple…  really it is… and growing your audience is key.

Start having conversations with with people wherever you are.  This is even more important for your business with its online presence.  Tell your story, make it interesting and evoke curiosity. How and why are you and your product here?  Talk about other topics that could resonate with your potential buyers. It is ok to be off topic and to be funny, so long as it resonates with your potential buyers who you want as your audience. Ask intriguing questions aims at your potential buyers problems, which then leads to the solution being your product or service, and watch as your audience not only grows but also the desire to have your product or service.

Be constant with your 2 or 3 social channels and start to share stories, customers’ experiences, answer questions, create remarkable content and engage. This is the key to growing your audience. Resolve curiosity with desire and solve your audience’s problem or need.

There is no doubt that curiosity can lead to greater interest and desire. It is this overflowing curiosity that will bring a greater audience which, if your messaging is pitched correctly, will evoke desire in your product or service. This results in bringing you closer to your end goal – bringing more customers further down your sale funnel.


For more information on anything in relation to social, digital or mobile – or for some advice or assistance with your social media strategy or how to measure, feel free to contact us at Mighty Media Group for a no obligation chat about how we can help you. Contact@mightymediagroup.com.au.

If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Business Owners Guide to Inbound Marketing

 


About the Author

Peta MattschossPeta Mattschoss is a content creator and community manager with Mighty Media Group. Peta continues to follow best practice and seeks out new and cutting edge Social Media and online applications to help businesses and individuals be seen and talked about through mediums such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Foursquare, to name a few.


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This image demonstrates content marketing on http://www.mightymediagroup.com.au

So your organisation has realised they need to prepare a social media strategy. You are not alone. Many companies continue to struggle with the success and increasing dominance of social media and are now realising this is not a passing fad but actually something they need to integrate into their marketing mix. There are some companies that do not know how to begin, and others who may have been using social media for some time in various forms, who still do not know how to define its success for them.

The best way to ensure social media success is to develop a strategy that defines clear goals and objectives, and has the ability and processes executed to measure success. But how and where do you begin?
There is far too much for me to cover in detail in this blog, however I can go through the top ingredients that make for a sound strategy and which will give you a solid starting point.

The first step is to start by asking some questions.

1. Who is your audience? Where do they congregate online?

2. What are your goals? Why do you want to incorporate social media into your marketing mix?

3. What is it that you want to achieve through the execution and management of social media?

4. How will you integrate social media into your existing communications plan? How will it be integrated into your website and other marketing materials?

5. What channels (social media platforms) are best for your company, your audience and for your particular message(s) to be best received?

6. How will you monitor and moderate conversations? and

7. How will you manage your various channels and pages?

These are great questions to wet the whistle and allow for some discussions to commence between your many stakeholders. Circulate an agenda and hold a brainstorming meeting, or a series of meetings, so that all areas of your business can contribute to the discussion.

When it comes to writing the actual strategy, you should consider addressing the following:

+  Why social media for your organisation, why now and what is the cost of inaction?

+  Who is your potential audience? Define your buyer personas so you and your team know the different needs and behaviours of your potential customers, which will make it easier to communicate consistently and relevantly to each. This will also greatly assist with effective messaging as well as gaining an understanding of where to best reach each of these personas.

+  What do you want social media to help you achieve? What are your short term and long term goals? How do these relate to the goals in your company’s Strategic Communication Plan?

Define your Social Media by way of Goal, Strategy and Tactic.

Basic example:

Goal

Increase Brand Strength and Liveability.

Strategy

Use Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and blogs to tell the company’s good news stories.

Tactic

Post good news stories on Facebook and Twitter daily; create YouTube videos demonstrating your brand/good news and write blogs telling your good news stories, then syndicate across channels.

Make sure your strategy looks at the barriers to reaching your goals in both the short and long term, and address how you will seek to overcome those barriers.

Corporate governance and guidelines will need to be addressed, as there are many areas that will need attention such as triage plans, house rules and privacy.

A major area that must be considered for any strategy to be effective is how to measure success. Are your goals ‘SMART’ (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Timed). How will you go about measuring success? What is the starting point to measure? What will signal success or partial success? What will signal failure? Do you need tools to assist with the ongoing measurement?

Even the most brilliant strategy will fall flat without a team with clearly defined responsibilities. This is easier if you have a dedicated social media team. If not it will take some negotiation. Assign the relevant and ongoing social media tasks to the appropriate members of the team.

When determining who is responsible for what activities, consider the following tasks as part of your social media efforts:

+  Creating content

+  Posting updates to social profiles

+  Discover and curating outside content

+  Outreach and engaging with your community

+  Monitoring conversations

+  Analysing data from conversations

+  Connecting with internal and external partners

You may work in a small organisation or even be a marketing team of only one. For you to achieve social media success requires a really tight strategy and clear understanding of exactly what success means. While this can be true for all companies, when you are strapped for resources (people and time), it is more important to focus on the right outcomes.

The final point I will make in relation to any strategy, which is especially relevant with a social media strategy, is that is not a “do once – and your done” activity. It should be a living document that is amended from time to time, to add new initiatives and to pull back on those that are not proving successful for your business.

To lean about how to measure ROI when it comes to measuring success check out our recent Blog Seven Questions to Ask Yourself about Your Inbound Marketing Strategy.


For more information on anything in relation to social, digital or mobile – or for some advice or assistance with your social media strategy, feel free to contact us at Mighty Media Group for a no obligation chat about how we can help you. Contact@mightymediagroup.com.au.

If you enjoyed this blog – please check out our latest ebook – “The Inbound Marketers Manifesto

 


About the Author

Bruce GrantBruce Grant is the Chief Integration Officer at Mighty Media Group and has a wealth of expertise and experience with managing people and projects along with data, systems, workflows and technology. He oversees the company’s implementation and technology teams, driving transformation from social media and digital strategy, with a focus on inbound marketing, web development, sales enablement, SEO, social media marketing and campaigns, blogging, content creation, analytics and much more. Follow Bruce on Twitter @BruceJohnGrant or drop him an email anytime on bruce.grant@mightymediagroup.com.au.


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